skip to content

 

Since re-opening, our regular visitors may notice some differences to what is on offer to families. Currently Fitz Kits, activity boxes, story starters, drawing materials and our baby play mat are not available to borrow. We do have free family trails but we suggest bringing your own paper and pencils if you want to draw in the gallery.

Family First Saturdays are back, with free themed self-led activities available for 2pm-4pm on the first Saturday of every month and free family tours. Don’t forget to book your free tickets for the museum and for the tours. Scroll down this page to find upcoming events. 

We will also continue sharing lots of different ways for you to connect with the collections, be inspired, create, respond and relax from home, with new activities released each month. Here are some for you to enjoy right now:

 

Storytelling

The Hedgehog that Needed a Rest

The Search for a Song

The Story of the Boat of Millions of Years

The Story of Vanessa and the Butterfly 

The Story of the Red Scarf

The Story of the Horse and the Lion

The Story of Demeter and Persephone

The Story of Hadrian and Antinous

Nursery Rhymes

 

Look Think Do

A set of activities designed as a starting point for looking, talking and doing together as a family. We hope people of all ages with enjoy the opportunity to spend some time with some of our collection favourites – from ancient Egypt to Impressionist painting.

Find out more

 

Home activities with University of Cambridge Museums

Looking for fun learning activities to try at home? From wildlife wanders to stories inspired by paintings, take your pick from this growing selection inspired by the University collections.

Summer at the Museums is delivered by the University of Cambridge Museums as part of its Arts Council England National Portfolio Organisation funded programme.

 

Hidden Tales

Our friends at Hidden Tales, in collaboration with the Arts Council of England have created a free activity pack for families based on Riddle of the White Sphinx. This interactive adventure book around museums in Cambridge is recommended for children aged aged 8+.

 

Events

Nine collections, six months

Thu, 22 Oct 2020

On 19 March, the University of Cambridge Museums and Botanic Garden closed to the public following Government advice. This week, we will be fully or partially open again across all sites for the first time in over six months. This post describes some of the activity we have delivered in that time, how we continued to serve our audiences, and... Read full article


Arts Award at Home

Mon, 19 Oct 2020

During lockdown the University of Cambridge Museums wanted to offer children and young people the chance to complete a Discover Arts Award from the comfort of their own homes for free. We hoped this would be a great way to encourage creativity among young people, keep them busy during school closures and school holidays, and give them a sense of... Read full article


Engaging children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) virtually through lockdown

Thu, 01 Oct 2020

During the Covid 19 lockdown University of Cambridge Museums wanted to engage remotely and maintain relationships with our pre-existing audience of children with special educational needs and disabilities. According to government statistics in January 2020 12.1% of all school pupils have a special educational need, and we have two main programmes for children with special educational needs and disabilities. Arts... Read full article


Look Think Do

Wed, 16 Sep 2020

Look Think Do is a set of starter activities the Fitzwilliam Museum learning team have been creating since the start of lockdown. They are aimed primarily at schools to use as remote learning activities for students, but are also written with families in mind, given that we recognised the majority of children would be learning at home supported by family... Read full article


Keeping Creativity Going During Lockdown

Wed, 17 Jun 2020

Pre-COVID19, our focus as educators was on understanding how to serve our young audiences by finding ways to help them come to the museum. Now we must switch our efforts to identifying how the museum can continue to be relevant and useful to them in their own homes. Look, think, do From the start of lockdown, the Learning Team at... Read full article