A selection of leading publishers in London and Paris

London

Rudolph Ackermann (1764-1834) opened his shop at 101 The Strand in 1795. He became a pioneer of lithography as a fine art.

Samuel W. Fores (1761-1838) had a shop on 3 Piccadilly, moving to 48-50 in 1795. His first print appeared in 1784. When in exile, Louis Philippe rented an apartment over Fores' showroom.

William Holland (1757-1815) set up an establishment in 1782 located at 66 Drury Lane. He moved to 50 Oxford Street in 1788, by which time he was publishing Gillray's prints. Holland and Fores displayed permanent exhibitions in the late 1780s for which there would be an admittance charge (1s). They included drawings and paintings, and caricatures from France. Holland was imprisoned in 1793 for selling a work by the radical Thomas Paine.

Hannah Humphrey (d.1818) was initially located on 18 Old Bond Street, and later moved to 37 New Bond Street (Gillray lodged at both these addresses from 1793), and then 27 St James' Street in 1797. She published Gillray's prints exclusively towards the end of 1791.

Robert Sayer (1725-1794), had a shop on no.53 Fleet Street, co-owned for a time with John Bennett. They were map and print sellers.

Paris

Jean Baptiste Genty (fl.1799-1830) was publishing prints from the Rue St Jacques on the left bank of Paris, one of a cluster of artists, artisans and print sellers on that street.

Aaron Martinet (1762-1841) established a business on Rue du Coq Saint-Honoré near the Louvre and Palais Royal in 1796, which became known for the caricatures displayed in its windows.


The Fitzwilliam Museum : A selection of leading publishers in London and Paris

By using this site you accept the
terms of our Cookie Policy

Vive la différence!
The English and French stereotype in satirical prints, 1720-1815

You are in: Online Resources > Online Exhibitions > Vive la difference! > ...